Author Archives: deamentiaemundi

About deamentiaemundi

I am just a grumpy old man; overweighted, hirsute, with bad teeth and even worse eyesight, sputtering absurdities and nonsense most, but not all of the time while steadfastily ignoring grammar and style of any language I write in. And now get off of my lawn!

Does somebody have a screwdriver? Anybody? Buehler?

Somebody—and I don’t want to look at anybody here—thought I would have massaged a photo with a Photoshop watercolour-filter and sold it as if I did it myself, manually, with a brush. I did not know what to make out of it: feel insulted or flattered? I did not use a Photoshop-filter, for I do not have Photoshop in the first place. On the other side: my watercolours are bad, some are even really bad, I’m pretty sure the Photoshop filter would have done a better job.

So what shall I do about it? Do it again, this time with a camera running along? Teh only one with a HD camera is my sister and it’s ont really a camera just a cell phone which you can’t screw on a tripod for lack of a screw hole in the camera. I could improvise something with some wires, rubber bands, and tape. Nuh, way too much work. A couple of stills will do, too. And the very same thing again? Nuh, boring!

The original was a screenshot from Google Earth, so I “traveled” a bit around the world and found another nice place, this time in Greece. So let’s do it. Well, actually: I’ll do it and all you can do is to helplessly watch the catastrophe building up πŸ˜‰

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Why you should check first if you can still comment on a threat

I wanted to revive an old threat elsewhere but did miss the fact that the ability to comment has already expired. I blame the bad UX, they really could have printed somewhere in big bold letters that you cannot comment anymore! πŸ˜‰

I had it already written at that time and, although it looses a bit without the context of the aforementioned threat, I have put too much work into it to simply send it to /dev/null, so here it is:

The Disadvantages of a Good Reception

Two elderly people in very old-fashioned tracking gear together with large wooden walking sticks, walking along a marble quarry.
In view but still in a distance of about 2km are some earth-coloured houses huddled in a dense, autumnal broad-leaf forest.

“Looks a bit, how shall I put it stale, hu?”
“What?”
“This thread here.”
“Oh, that thread, yeah, okay. Good reception here, I s’pose? And what do you want me to do about it?”
“CPR?”
“How do you applicate CPR to a threat that is not only purely virtual but seems to be quite dead, too, since last summer?”
“Dunno, it’s something about art, so do something artsy.”
“And how am I supposed to do that?”
“You are the artist! Scratch your head, stroke your beard, get heavily drunk, or whatever artists do to get an idea and do something…”
“…artsy, got it. Any wishes?”
“Dunno, paint something?”
“I’m a sculptor and really bad at painting.”
“Yeah, that’s true.”
“Hey!”
“Ow, c’mon, I saw what you did to the walls of your kitchen! Is it so difficult to paint something white? Just plain white?”
“Seems so…”
“So what do you need for that sculpting thingy?”
“A mallet, a set of chisels, and…do you want it quickly?”
“Yepp.”
“So something softer, sandstone? No, don’t like the color, it’s always so beige! Marble maybe? Yeah, marble. I’ll take that block over there.”
“Isn’t it nice that we stand, just by chance, near a marble quarry—although not that unlikely, as close to Casette as we are—but the block you are pointing to is a bit large, don’t you think?”
“Nuh, medium sized. At most. I would say about 1m x 1.5m x 2m. At least that’s what’s written on it.”
“I’d call that big! And how much does that stump tip the scales?”
“Density about 2.7 tons per cubic meter according to Google, so…uhm… a tad bit more than eight tons.”
“At least it’s not an eight ton stork.”
“What?”
“Oh, nothing, nothing. And it costs a fortune, doesn’t it?”
“Not really, in that quality about $250 per ton, if not less.”
“Still two grands! What’s about something cheaper, like, dunno, watercolor?”
“Like we did in kindergarten?”
“Yeah.”
“But I never got better at it since then!”
“But it’s cheap?”
“Yepp.”
“So be it.”
“Where do I send the bill?”
“Whut?”
“Just kidding, just kidding. I think in this time of these so called listicles I’ll make one myself and it will be about:”

Things ending [cue drumroll] badly

“Does politics belong in art?”
“That’s discussable.”
“Yeah. And now?”
“There is no bar in Casette, as far as I know, but a small supermarket.”
“How do you…? Oh, forget it, it’ll do.”

New Gardening Project: A Hole II

Fourth step: Do not drill too deep! The lower side of the groundwater is a watertight layer of some sort. Here it is marl (a kind of clay) of a greyish colour.

The watertight layer here is a greyish marl

The watertight layer here is a greyish marl


There is absolutely no need to drill into it and a waste of time and money (I paid for the meter drilled including the necessary amount of well casing). Also: the lowest part of the well casing is a filter. In most cases it is just the same pipe as the well casing with fine slits (3mm is enough here but your mileage may vary) but there are more expensive solutions, too. Any length of this filter inside the watertight layer if of little use and reduces the area where the groundwater can flow in.

Fifth step: case the well, that is: put a pipe into the hole to avoid the collapse of the whole. The drill string should be hollow to allow for it and needs a drill bit that you can screw out from above.

Well with pipe

Well with pipe


with pipe (blue) and some elongation (brownish)

Peek into well-hole with pipe (blue) and some elongation (brownish)


The pipe is something you can buy at e.g.: Amazon, at least that’s what I thought but despite a lot of hits for “Brunnenrohr” at amazon.de I got nothing at amazon.com for “well casing” except for the caps for the top.

Sixth step: clean up the whole mess before you go on πŸ˜‰

Quite a mess!

Quite a mess!

Next: securing the well with the help of a bag of concrete.

New Gardening Project: A Hole

First step: find a good place for it. Hint: dowsing does not work.
Second step: mark it.

It's just a stick in the ground. The story about the grounded Stick is over at the BBC.

It’s just a stick in the ground. The story about the grounded Stick is over at the BBC.


Third step: empty out everything that’s not a hole.
This things costs a fortune and has no build-in level?

This things costs a fortune and has no build-in level, save an auto-level?


The tomatoes do not grow very well this year.

The tomatoes do not grow very well this year.

We should have a nice little hole at this point. As this hole is deep enough to reach groundwater level and beyond we can make a lot more out of it, for example: a well.

A nice little how-to, a bit more useful than this will be put in my next post.

Multi-Precision Floats: Radix Conversion with Large Exponents

[UPDATE] bugfix in code listing
The method for the radix conversion of floating point numbers described more theoretically here and more practically here has one large drawback: albeit always correct it is abysmally slow for large magnitudes.

Is there a faster way to do it? Yes, there is! Continue reading